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You Are In Black Bear Country

Photo of close up of a black bear's faceResident and visitors are reminded that the Municipality of Trent Lakes is black bear country. Seeing a black bear in its natural habitat can be a thrill or a cause for alarm. Most black bears are shy of humans and keep a distance. Often a bear is searching for food and if it doesn’t find a source it passes through to other territory where it can feed.

Never feed bears or any other wildlife. As more people live and frequent bear country, an abundance of unnatural food sources can become available to bears. Bears are attracted to anything scented and/or edible. Improperly stored food and garbage are temptations few bears can resist. They become less cautious of people and may display bold behavior when trying to get to human food. Bears that have become indifferent to the presence of people and have access to human food sources may cause property damage and threaten public safety. Every year in Ontario law enforcement and Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry personnel respond to hundreds of calls in which bears have become a nuisance and may pose a public safety threat and/or are damaging property. In some cases, the animals are euthanized.

The Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry has a wealth of information available on their website at:  https://www.ontario.ca/bearwise

Who to contact

Emergencies

Call 911 or your local police, if you feel a bear poses an immediate threat to personal safety and:

  • enters a school yard when school is in session
  • enters or tries to enter a residence
  • wanders into a public gathering
  • kills livestock/pets and lingers at the site
  • stalks people and lingers at the site

Generally, bears want to avoid humans. Most encounters are not aggressive and attacks are rare.

Non-emergencies

Call the Bear Wise reporting line at 1-866-514-2327 (*between April 1-November 30) if a bear is:

  • roaming around, checking garbage cans
  • breaking into a shed where garbage or food is stored
  • in a tree
  • pulling down a bird feeder or knocking over a barbecue
  • moving through a backyard or field but is not lingering

* From Dec 1-March 31, please contact: Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry, Southern Region
Phone: 1-800-667-1940, Address: Robinson Place South Tower 4th Floor S, 300 Water St, Peterborough, ON K9J 8M5

Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry Bear Info Sheets

(printable):